QUOTES ON ENDING POLICE VIOLENCE THROUGH METABOLIZING TRAUMA

  • “My Grandmother’s Hands” by Resmaa Menakem, Therapist and Trainer of the Minneapolis Police Department and
  • A News Article from the Star Tribune of Minneapolis by Vina Kay, Executive Director of Voices for Racial Justice, on August 1, 2018, “A time to understand, and address, starkly different responses to trauma: That could aid the change we need to end police violence and heal as a community”

If we don’t address our ancient historical trauma, what will we pass down to our children, and to their children and grandchildren?” Page 63, “My Grandmother’s Hands”

For America to outgrow the bondage of white body supremacy, white Americans need to imagine themselves in Black, red, and brown bodies and EXPERIENCE what those bodies had to endure. They also need to do the same with the bodies of their own white ancestors.” Page 63, “My Grandmother’s Hands”

“We’ve been trained to think of the past in terms of a written historical record. But events don’t just get written down; they get recorded and passed on in human bodies.” Page 72, “My Grandmother’s Hands”

It is now up to us – you and to me and to everyone else who cares about human beings – to put a stop to this cycle of trauma. This means metabolizing the trauma in OUR bodies.” Page 82, “My Grandmother’s Hands”

ON THE BODY PRACTICES Authored by RESMAA MENAKEM “A practice of awareness, body-centered exercises, discomfort and settling can move us beyond those trauma responses that are stuck in our bodies.” (Vina Kay, Executive Director of Voices for Racial Justice,  August 1, 2018, “A time to understand, and address, starkly different responses to trauma,” startribune.com)

ON AN ENCOUNTER THAT CULMINATED IN A FATAL OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTING: “Trauma is not an excuse for harmful action. But perhaps it can help us understand what we are witnessing in (such a video), see our collective historical trauma reflected in it and begin moving toward the deeper change we need in our culture to end police violence and heal as a community.” (Tina Kay)

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